Euphotic
Isopleths (CD)
Public Eyesore 2020

1. Sulfolobus
2. Histioteuthis bonnellii
3. Pluton
4. Lithotroph
5. Bristlemouth
6. Echolocution
7. Flinch Flies

Cheryl Leonard: driftwood, sand, rocks, feathers, marsh reeds, penguin bones, pine needles and oyster shells
Tom Djll: trumpet and electronics
Bryan Day: invented instruments

Recorded in San Francisco (2018), and Betalevel, Los Angeles (2019)
Mastered by Thomas Dimuzio
Photos by Cheryl, Design by Bryan

Reviews:
(Vital Weekly) The previous time the name Euphotic appeared in these pages was not about a work for a trio of musicians who now deliver 'Isopleths', but as the title of a release by Chihei Hatakeyama and Corey Fuller (Vital Weekly 1033). The word means "noting or pertaining to the layer or zone of seawater that receives enough sunlight for photosynthesis to occur, varying greatly with season and latitude, from 0 to 1,200 feet (0–360 meters)". The trio here is Bryan day on invented instruments, Tom Djll on trumpet and electronics and Cheryl Leonard on driftwood, sand, rocks, feathers, marsh reeds, penguin bones, pine needles and oyster shells. That is three quite different approaches to creating sounds, ranging from natural objects, a real instrument and whatever Day uses (I believe something with strings and wood). The seven pieces on this release were recorded in 2018 and 2019 and are pieces of improvised music. Here too they deliver quite the variety of approaches. 'Pluton', for instance, starts out with some heavy noise with much distortion on the electronics, while in other pieces the emphasis lies on the use of 'small' sounds, at times touched upon carefully and at other times hectic and chaotic. Like a jazz trio, it seems that sometimes an instrument takes the lead, such as the trumpet in 'Bristlemouth', but that too isn't the principle idea of these improvisations; just as easily everything appears on an equal level, with nobody leaping out, such as in 'Echolucation', which also uses quite a bit electronics on Djl's part. Sometimes, this comes across as very traditionally improvised, albeit with less non-conventional sound devices, and sometimes not all, working from a microsound level, exploring small sound events. In the time-span of forty-eight minutes they cover a lot of ground and there is plenty to discover on the grounds. This is quite a beautiful release. - Frans de Waard